LAUFENBURG IN A NUTSHELL

SUNDAY, 11th June

Another day exploring beautiful Switzerland. Two sister towns that form LAUFENBURG  are quite exceptional. The history of left and right LAUFENBURG as independent towns began when Napoleon, in 1801, forced areas left of the Rhine to separate from the Holy Roman Empire in the treaty of Luneville.

LAUFENBURG AARGAU – since 1803 the left part of LAUFENBURG belongs to the new founded canton of AARGAU, Switzerland.  The history is directly perceptible in the scenic, mostly intact downtown. The medieval alleys, corners, towers, wells, stairs and cobbled pathways come together to create a never fading history.  The population numbers approximately 2,000.

 

As we walked the old town we came upon a great place to enjoy our lunch. On this day there was a Fish Festival. Marquees were set up and local men were cooking and serving drinks with a choice of two fish meals – there was a great community atmosphere and we found seats at the end of a table where there was room for the four of us (Hedi had joined us today).

Having thoroughly enjoyed our fish lunch we were now about to walk to the Bridge to cross the River Rhine to LAUFENBURG BADEN, a small city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. (Population approx. 4,300). Festivals are still an essential part of life and bring new life to the mediaeval lanes. Today the two towns are only separated by the Rhine River.

Today we had lunch in Switzerland and afternoon tea in Germany.

4 thoughts on “LAUFENBURG IN A NUTSHELL

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s