LIVING LIFE AS AN EXPAT. – UPDATE 13

Keeping it ‘Riel’ (currency of Cambodia 4,000 riel = $US1)

So, we are one year on and as David and I reflected over Brunch this morning we thought it was important to be real in terms of what living in Cambodia means for us.

What is hardest?

Not being with our family and friends. It is challenging to be distant as people at home continue ‘doing life’ and we miss being part of it. The incidental conversations, time to ‘be’ in one another’s space, sharing in the highlights and lowlights, just journeying together. We have lovely people to live and journey with here……but it is not quite the same as those who know you so well that you don’t have to share conversation to be on the same page.

What is easiest?

Not much to be honest, but it is ‘easy’ in that we know that we are in a place and space where we can contribute in a real and useful manner. Having said that, things are only not ‘easy’ because many things are just a bit different from home. In reality we have a comfortable place to live; a fantastic workplace; access to good food; transport; a lively church community, opportunities to get out and about, a skilled hairdresser; someone who comes to clean our house; someone who will not only cook for us, but deliver the meals hot to our door for a fair price; and we are surrounded by caring co-workers and school families.

Highlights of the past year

  • Hosting family and friends to introduce them to our school community and our home town of Phnom Penh. Seeing our kids at Christmas was a particular highlight!
  • Seeing some good progress in various areas at work. David has made some amazing progress in different areas of the facilities,  building on (pardon the pun) the work of those who have gone before him. I have had the chance to refine various areas of our schooling approach, and I am pleased to see a stronger consistent focus on good teaching and learning. Student voice in the school is growing and care for the health and wellbeing of students and staff is at the forefront of decision making.
  • Travel opportunities:  we have had the opportunity to spend extended time in Thailand, Vietnam and Sri Lanka this year. For the first time in our working lives our holidays align. I have also attended professional training in Singapore and Malaysia. It is wonderful to expand our understanding of this part of the world.
  • Working with students, families and staff from around the globe.We are so much richer for the multicultural community we are in; we have learned new education language – task, cover, set… and the fact that I inevitably use Australian colloquialisms that draw blank looks; new food – river snails were not a highlight, new cultural traditions – Water Festival, Pchum Benh; new expectations and new things to laugh at!

And finally, keeping it ‘riel’ we continue to live a relatively wealthy existence. While we work at a mission school and receive a living allowance rather than salary, when I checked on the Care Global Rich List calculator this morning, our combined income continues to put us in the top 4% of income earners globally. We know that we are living far more comfortably than many of those in our immediate community as our life includes so many elements that are still inaccessible to many here in Cambodia:  we have electricity (and air con.), running water, a home which does not flood, access to health care without needing to pay before receiving service, access to three meals a day, and enough income to take holidays, eat at restaurants and pay for recreation.  We are indeed fortunate!

 

 

Cheryl Flight

Secondary School Principal

HOPE School.               principal.sec@hope.edu.